littlepot's snowflakes

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My snowflakes:
winter, snow, nordic stuff (landscape, mythology, anthropology, etc.), (black) cats, owls, mysteries... falling on the ground.

I'm desperately in love with languages and etymology, and yes, with folklore and hidden meanings. Any suggestion is very welcome!

"A thing of beauty is a joy for ever" (Keats)

birdsandbirds:

Saw-whet Owl

Owl Woods

Braddock Bay, NY

(via serenitytranquality)

— 2 weeks ago with 155 notes
terriwindling:

Once upon a time there was a girl, there was a boy, there was a poor woman who wanted, there was a queen who couldn’t have, there was a witch who lived under, there was a green frog at the bottom of, there was a troll, a tree, a bear, a bright-eyed bird who knew the secret of, there was a fairy who had lost, there was a child who had found, there was a wizard who had made, there was a princess who had broken, there was a story trying to be told. Listen. The wind is speaking.

terriwindling:

Once upon a time there was a girl, there was a boy, there was a poor woman who wanted, there was a queen who couldn’t have, there was a witch who lived under, there was a green frog at the bottom of, there was a troll, a tree, a bear, a bright-eyed bird who knew the secret of, there was a fairy who had lost, there was a child who had found, there was a wizard who had made, there was a princess who had broken, there was a story trying to be told. Listen. The wind is speaking.

(via mythsweliveby)

— 2 weeks ago with 2853 notes
The Nafnathulur in English Translation (Nafnaþulur) | Lofn’s Bard

lokisbruid:

The Nafnathulur in English Translation (Nafnaþulur) | Lofn’s Bard

The Nafnathulur is the the last part of the Skáldskaparmál in Snorri’s Prose Edda. It isn’t present in all the original manuscripts, and thus is usually omitted from modern versions. Some scholars believe it predates Snorri’s work while others say it’s a later addition. Seeing as Snorri Sturluson wrote his book two hundred years after everyone converted to Christianity, I don’t think saying it…

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— 1 month ago with 7 notes
http://magipojkens-trolldom.tumblr.com/post/73719545114/havamal93-mentioned-galdrabokin-the-witchcraft →

magipojkens-trolldom:

havamal93 mentioned “Galdrabókin” (the witchcraft book) to me, so I looked it up a little, and found it’s a 1500’s Icelandic book which was translated by a Swede and republished a few times. Haxhem (where I found the links) says:

Det är intressant att läsa om svensk folkmagi och…
— 1 month ago with 10 notes
Old Swedish trolls and their magic, witches/wizards, etc. pt1

magipojkens-trolldom:

Tonight I’m translating a bit out of this book, which is comprised of two volumes:

—eet land, som hetir Wærand. — Thær war
ok mykit got, swa som godh fiskewatn,
bi ok honagh, akir ok wæna ænghia, ok
thiokke skogha, — ok margahanda diwr
innan.
STOCKHOLM, 1863-1868.

(—a land, which is called Värend. — There was
also much good, such as good fishing-waters,
bees and honey, fields and beautiful meadows, and
thick forests, — and many animals
within.)

It is a book dealing with folk-beliefs in Värend and southern Småland (places in Sweden). Written by Prof. Geo. Stephens at the King’s University in Copenhagen, information collected for many years, these volumes have a lot of sections about witchcraft and heathen beliefs! This beginning section is talk about different trolls, witches/warlocks and goblins etc.

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— 1 month ago with 17 notes
List of old Swedish animal/place names for fantasy writers

magipojkens-trolldom:

…or whoever else could make use of such a list. This is language from the 1860’s and a bit earlier, from Värend and Småland (south of Sweden). Place names first, then dialectal words for animals etc. I added in the modern standard Swedish word if the one they had listed was obsolete, in that case to pick the older word pick the “(obsolete)” one. Source is here.

Place names using trees:  (a lot of these I can’t translate but I translated the animal names)

hult, hylta - Värendic dialect word for ”a forest with broad-leaf trees”, usually meaning oak or beech. Often in the end of place-names. Ex. Lönshult, Lindehult, Elmhult
Eke (oak) - Eke, Ekemoen, Ekewarfven (the oak warf), Fagereke (beautiful oak), Fröseke (frozen oak?), Welleke.
() - Bökemoen, Bökebacken, Böket, Wrångeböke
Ask (ash) - Eskås, Lönsås, Lindås, Almås, Elmisås,
Hässle (hazel, as in hazelnut) - Hässle, Hasslebäck (hazel brook), Hässlemoen, Rotehässle
Björke (birch) - Björke, Saxabjörke, Lindbjörke
Skog (forest) - Ulfvaskog (wolf forest), Mörkaskog (dark/murky forest), Ledaskog, Högaskog (tall forest), Bondeskog (farmer forest), Holstenskog

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— 1 month ago with 8 notes
magipojkens-trolldom:

By chance I came across this phase of the moon calendar on an Icelandic site. So simply go to this link and look on the right-hand side to find the calendar, if you are unable to do the Swedish finger technique for finding the new moon that I posted about earlier.
sun = sunday, mið = wednesday, fös = friday, lau = saturday
Here is another moon calendar (Swedish one): http://www.kalender-365.se/manen/mankalender.htmlThis one uses real photos.Må = Monday, On = Wednesday, Fr = Friday, Sö = Sunday

magipojkens-trolldom:

By chance I came across this phase of the moon calendar on an Icelandic site. So simply go to this link and look on the right-hand side to find the calendar, if you are unable to do the Swedish finger technique for finding the new moon that I posted about earlier.

sun = sunday, mið = wednesday, fös = friday, lau = saturday

Here is another moon calendar (Swedish one): http://www.kalender-365.se/manen/mankalender.html
This one uses real photos.
Må = Monday, On = Wednesday, Fr = Friday, Sö = Sunday

— 1 month ago with 3 notes

rocklovejewelry:

Winternights, Yule, Solstice
More @facebook.com/rocklovefanpage

(via norsemenarise)

— 1 month ago with 180 notes